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Depression

Depression and its Impact on Marriages

Friday, 18 November, 2016


Depression is a mood disorder that can commonly onset immediately following a breakup or divorce with a partner. However, the condition can also be the leading factor in what caused the split between two people to begin with. Complications with mental health can wreak havoc on relationships which are already imperfect.

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The Depression and Anxiety Cycle

Monday, 21 September, 2015

Depression and anxiety are closely related and they work together in an antagonistic way. Severe anxiety can cause depression due to the overwhelming fear that ‘it’ will not get better. Whether it is a situation, event or a memory from the past, once a person becomes paralyzed with fear depression and hopelessness are just around the corner. Many times people go to residential treatment for depression symptoms only to find out that anxiety is the root issue. A residential treatment for depression and anxiety will help you simultaneously eliminate both of these mood disorders.

When an individual attempts to manage moods without the intervention of a residential treatment for depression and anxiety, it can lead to seeking unhealthy alternatives. Drug and alcohol abuse, gambling, shopping and other forms of unhealthy behaviors become forms of self-medication for mood discomfort. Once the initial change in feelings ends, the uncomfortable emotion remains. From this we learn that temporary fixes only contribute to supporting the uncomfortable mood.

Addiction only makes depression and anxiety worse and the individual is often left with unresolved emotions. If there is an additional substance abuse issue involved, it is imperative to find a residential treatment for depression and anxiety that will address addiction too. Focusing only on addiction can hurt and cause more damage resulting in the need for immediate additional care. Proper guidance, education and healthy outlets help to stop the depression and anxiety cycle.

Rachel Rowitt, Ed.D, LMHC, CAP has worked in the field of clinical psychology for 15 years. She is a freelance writer who specializes in educating the community about the effects of mental illness, addiction and how to make effective changes. She has been affiliated with Lifeskills, a residential treatment facility for mental illness and addiction, for over 5 years. 

The Suicide Trap

Thursday, 10 September, 2015

Have you ever interacted with someone who on the outside appears happy, collected and participating in life, only to find out they have attempted suicide? What the person did not show

was the inside, where they are in tremendous pain and suicide had become an option. People with this idea are usually waiting for the right time to execute their plan, because they feel

helplessly trapped and overwhelmed by suicidal thoughts.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) 2013 report, 41,149 people in America committed suicide. This number continues to grow. The leading group to successfully kill themselves in 2013 was 15-24 year olds. The devastation of suicide impacts all those who knew the individual no matter what the age of their lost loved one might have been. Unless this dangerous pattern is externally intervened upon by family, friends or in residential treatment, over time these recurring behaviors and thoughts will strengthen securing one into the suicide trap.

What Sets the Suicide Trap?

People who decide taking their own life is an option do not believe there is any way out of how they are feeling. This may be linked to their actual situation or they may have an inability to get past certain life events that have left them feeling hopelessly trapped. Traumas, deaths of loved ones, sexual abuse, physical abuse, drug and alcohol abuse are just a few of the events leading to negative thought patterns, giving way to the option of suicide. Sometimes people blame themselves for situations that have occurred and may have been out of their control. For example, a physically abused young adult may think, “I am a bad person and no one will ever accept me. I am already alone, so if I die it won’t matter.” Although this is just an example, many people who come through residential treatment make similar statements.

Others struggle with chemical imbalances and the impulsivity of wanting to die in a moment of despair, which can lead to a successful suicide. Many people with borderline personality disorder, bipolar disorder and depression may have taken their own life based upon a fleeting feeling. A permanent fix for a temporary feeling, no matter how toxic that emotion might be, reveals a problem in one’s thinking. It can blind the person who is contemplating suicide, making it extremely difficult to see that change can be around the corner. For example, a person with borderline personality disorder may make a statement like, “This pain I have is too much and no one understands what I am feeling. If I was dead, then they would understand.” For this individual, the trap has been set and this type of negative thinking may lead to a self-harm gesture which sometimes ends in suicide.

How to Help the Suicidal Person

There is a way out of the suicide trap. First, it is important to not minimize how someone feels or question them in a challenging way. Instead, approach them from a concerned and patient mind-set. This will allow you to maintain open communication instead of them shutting you out. Second, understand you have no control over changing a person’s suicidal thoughts no matter how much you care about the individual. It is important to know your options for introducing professional help into the situation. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255 and is available 24/7 to help your loved one to have a connection anytime. Lastly, it is important as family and friends to continue educating yourself about suicide prevention and residential treatment options as your first line of defense.

Rachel Rowitt, Ed.D, LMHC, CAP has worked in the field of clinical psychology for 15 years. She is a freelance writer who specializes in educating the community about the effects of mental illness, addiction and how to make effective changes. She has been affiliated with Lifeskills, a residential treatment facility for mental illness and addiction, for over 5 years.

Memories are Forever

Monday, 17 August, 2015

Do you know someone who states their anxiety, depression or borderline personality disorder prevents them from being able to interact? It is frustrating to sit and watch while your loved ones miss out on activities and life’s special moments. Graduations, births, birthdays and weddings are just of few memories that can never be recreated. Unfortunately, some may use their depression, anxiety, borderline personality disorder and many other diagnoses as an excuse to not participate in life.

Depression can cause you to feel unable to make a change. Borderline personality disorder is controlled by fluctuating emotions that leave you feeling powerless to change. Anxiety can feel so overwhelming that you feel change is beyond your reach. It is difficult for the person who is suffering to really see the impact he or she is having on others. They need help from someone who can be objective. Counselors who have been specially trained to treat mental health disorders are essential for your loved one to recover.

A residential treatment facility that specializes in depression, anxiety and borderline personality disorder has professionals who are able to help. Learning how to effectively manage unwanted emotions and behaviors takes time. This can be found in a structured program that offers individualized attention. The overall goal is to help your loved one to live a life full of special memories.

Rachel Rowitt, Ed.D, LMHC, CAP has worked in the field of clinical psychology for 15 years. She is a freelance writer who specializes in educating the community about the effects of mental illness, addiction and how to make effective changes. She has been affiliated with Lifeskills, a residential treatment facility for mental illness and addiction, for over 5 years.

Don’t Leave a Legacy of Pain

Thursday, 28 August, 2014

When a family member decides to take their own life they leave a legacy of pain. Although this might be an unintended side effect it does not minimize the pain experienced by the surviving family members. While we can never really know how much pain another is experiencing. And we feel compassion for those who end their lives. We must remind ourselves that problems in our lives and emotional pain are short lived, things change. It was so ironic that Robin Williams was quoted as saying “suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem”. Remember hope, have empathy, love our children, laugh, play, ask for help, let others in, we are part of a bigger whole-connected-one. Don’t leave a legacy of pain.

Robin Williams and Depression

Sunday, 24 August, 2014

Robin_WilliamsAll too often it is the tragic loss of a celebrity that brings mental illness to the forefront of our minds. In losing Robin Williams to suicide, the press has been abuzz with words like “suicide,” “depression,” “mental illness,” and “addiction.” What has not been as frequently mentioned is a key component in managing all of those challenges…hope.

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, One in four adults−approximately 61.5 million Americans−experiences mental illness in a given year. Of those 61.5 million, only 60 percent receive any mental health treatment. I wonder how much of that is related to shame, embarrassment and fear? Scientific research has consistently shown that those with even low levels of hope are less likely to act on suicidal thoughts or impulses. But how do we impart hope to those who are struggling with depression and feel all alone? Education. We live in a society where independence and self-sufficiency are valued. Looking to others for support is often seen as a weakness. By helping others to understand depression is a medical illness, not a character flaw, we can begin to impart hope that things can get better.

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